Discrimination

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Discrimination is the prejudicial treatment of an individual based on their actual or perceived membership in a certain group or category, in a way that is worse than the way people are usually treated.


Parameters

Discrimination involves the group's initial reaction or interaction, influencing the individual's actual behavior towards the group or the group leader, restricting members of one group from opportunities or privileges that are available to another group, leading to the exclusion of the individual or entities based on logical or irrational decision making. Discriminatory traditions, policies, ideas, practices, and laws exist in many countries and institutions in every part of the world, even in ones where discrimination is generally looked down upon. In some places, controversial attempts such as quotas or affirmative action have been used to benefit those believed to be current or past victims of discrimination—but have sometimes been called reverse discrimination themselves.

Discrimination exists within the confines of BDSM Cultures as well as outside, usually in the following forms:

  • Age
  • Caste
  • Disability or Health
  • Employment or Wealth
  • Evaluative Orientation
  • Language
  • Nationality
  • Racial or Ethnic
  • Regional or Cultural
  • Religious
  • Reverse
  • Sex, Gender, and Gender-identity
  • Sexual Orientation

Best Practices

Best Practices indicate to be mindful of The first rule of pervert club and remember that while everyone is entitled to preferences, it is unethical to treat others as if they are less than, look down upon others, or to otherwise mistreat them because they do not meet your specific preferences.

Whenever possible strive to embrace a more educated, inclusive, tolerant and positive attitude towards those that are different, especially if you happen to serve as a policy maker.

See Also Coming Out, Cultural Exclusivity, One True Way, and Role Essentialism.